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Ms. Leserman's Internet Classroom

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How Things Are In This Class

 
Mrs. Leserman's Rules for Talking In Class (or anywhere else):
Just ask yourself:
1.  Is it true?
2.  Is it kind?
3.  Is it helpful?
4.  Is it  my turn?
 
Conduct in Class and Statement of Common Courtesy

1.  All school rules will be followed in the classroom.

2.  You must listen when another person is speaking to the class, whether this person is the teacher or another student. 

3.  All members of the classroom will treat each other at all times with civility and respect.

4.  Show respect for the physical person, property, and reasonable pursuits of other class members.

5.  Sunglasses and hats must be removed when entering the class.

6.  Electronic devices must be INVISIBLE and INAUDIBBLE to the instructor at all times, or they are confiscated until picked up by a parent.

7.  Unless instructed otherwise, please remain in your seat until the teacher dismisses the class.

8.  There is no “dead” time in class.  If you have finished your classroom assignment, you are free to work on your homework for this class (first priority) or another class (second priority).

 

Homework, Seating, and Grading

1.  Seating is assigned, and subject to change by the instructor, sometimes just because I feel like it.  If your seat is changed, it does not mean that you have been "bad" but that your teacher has some hidden agenda for mixing things up (that you'll never know) -- Try to show some flexibility and recognize that life is change, and change is life, and that you'll get to know your new neighbors just fine. 

 

2.  This is an English class, EVERYTHING counts – spelling, neatness, grammar, the whole thing.  Hand-written assignments are to be completed on lined paper, in blue or black ink, observing the assigned format. Longer-term assignments, such as reports and story writing, must be typed.   Illegible work will be returned for rewriting, and marked late, as appropriate.

 

3.  Timeliness is the cornerstone of quality work.  As a rule, late work is not accepted (except in the event of an excused absence).  I try to make homework relevant to the activities in class on the day it is due; it is often irrelevant or superfluous to make it up later.  On a case-by-case basis, I may allow an occasional assignment to be made up.  This will be entirely at my discretion, and the assignment will be downgraded by one full letter for each calendar-day it is late.

 

4.  100-point rubrics are provided for major writing assignments to simplify grading.  Scoring overall is as follows:  90-100% = A; 80-89% = B; 70-79% = C; 60-69% = D, and anything lower than 59% is F.  Positive participation in class sways grades upwards.

5.  There are 100 points altogether in this class. 

6.  A student must get 90% on an assignment to get a point.  However, a student may repeat an on-time turned-in assignment as many times as necessary, in order to get 90% (and to claim a point).  

7.  If a student does not turn in work on time, the student may lose the chance to earn a point.

8.  Work Habits grade each five week period: All assignments complete = E; 1-2 assignments missed = S;  3 or more assignments missed = U.

 

What you will need for this class:

1.  A positive, helpful attitude

2.  Plenty of college-lined paper in a three-ring notebook with dividers for note-taking.

3.  At least one black and white college-lined composition book for daily classroom writing assignments

4.  Black- or blue-ink pens for daily writing, and red-inked pens for corrections

5.  Internet access, either at home or at school or public library.

 

Please feel free to contact me with any questions or constructive comments.

-- Mrs. Leserman

 

What is Plagarism, and How to Avoid It -- A thorough description of all forms of academic dishonesty.
 
Avoiding Plagarism -- "Plagiarism occurs when one steals or uses the ideas or writings of another and presents these writings or ideas as his or her own." -- Useful links and discussion
 
 




Email me at awl6753 @ lausd.k12.ca.us